Nicole Ericson First Blog Post

How Do I look?

BBC published an article about an exhibition at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) in New York City that provides insight into the changing ideal female body types since the 18th Century.

FIT constructed this exhibition to argue that fashionability has been culturally constructed long before social media. They are encouraging more people to challenge this ideal and generate more approval for body diversity.

The article follows four centuries of fashion, describing each centuries most sought after look. Each century changed the way females looked and perceived themselves in everyday life. Whether it be having broad shoulders or a perfect waist, fashion trends set the standard for what you had to look like in order to be accepted in society.

Today,  females struggle with positive body image, and with social media changing the way we view fashion, many find it difficult to keep up with the latest trends. They shame themselves for not looking like ‘the girl on Instagram’. The photos used within the article show a progression of what body part was valued more during that time period. As times changed different parts of the body were seen as more ideal. Today there are such high standards for what a perfect body looks like that there is more than one part of the body that needs to be perfect. (See Below)

Consumption of fashion is forever changing with the evolving multimedia world. Social media especially, has altered our view of the ideal body. This article generates interest through explaining different eras of fashion and progressing to where we are today.

 

 

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